Summary for March 24, Crimea

by Dmitry Tymchuk

Brothers and sisters!
Here is the summary for March 24 (for the summary from the previous day, see Summary of March 23).

The bad news:

1. The threat of Russian invasion to our southeast is still present, and remains high. Today, this was stated by the RNBO[U] (National Security and Defense Council of Ukraine).

I don’t know which is worse – the fact that Putin does not give up on his plans, or that every move of the RNBO[U] comes incredibly late, while in this situation, every day, if not hour, is of the essence.

This includes the decision of the RNBO[U] to redeploy Ukrainian troops from Crimea. Had it been made some 10 days ago, we could have let our militaries leave Crimea honorably, in full force, under flying banners. Now, God willing, we might get a few hundred servicemen out, and even that will resemble a flight.

One thing is clear – something needs to be done about the RNBO[U]. I understand that its heads need time to learn the ropes – it’s a field that’s entirely new for them. But they should become more open to outside experts, of whom there are plenty in Ukraine. I’m not talking about myself, I’m just a watchdog of transparency in the sphere of national security. But there are real powerhouses and idea generators out there. They are at hand – there are plenty of think tanks in the country. Yes, 95% of those people are also freeloaders, but the remaining 5% are excellent minds ready to work for the good of their country. Use them!

2. Starting May 9, a new law comes into force in Russia. Under this law, public calls for the violation of Russia Federatop territorial integrity are punishable by up to 3 years in prison. Naturally, Putin will apply this law to his ill-gotten Crimea as well.

Considering that, according to social surveys (which are more believable than the Crimean “referendum”), at least 60% of Crimean residents were against joining Russia, and thus, they will find themselves in a difficult situation.

On the other hand, this is a great lesson for Ukraine. Rounding up our own separatists and packing them into prisons would have solved this problem for decades to come. We don’t even have to make excuses – we can simply follow in the footsteps of Russia, much beloved by said separatists. Hopefully, the Verkhovna Rada [Ukrainian Parliament] won’t do their usual slowpoke act, but quickly take this on board.

3. I was moved to tears listening to the speech of [Olexander] Yefremov, leader of the Party of Regions faction. He basically voiced Russia’s ultimatum to Ukraine, passing it off as “proposals” of his political party. When informed of this regretful fact, he proceeded to immediately fake indignation, in an act worthy of an actor from The Asylum studio – “Oh, no! How can this be? What a coincidence!”

I understand that such politicians are ready to star in the cheapest and most twisted blockbusters directed by the Kremlin, for nothing more than a bottle of beer. I also understand that some of the ultimatum’s suggestions do correspond to the spirit of the time. But whether Ukraine needs them – that will be decided by Ukrainians, without any ultimatums from Big Brother. While gentlemen like Mr. Yefremov need to be taken aside gently, looked in the eye, and quietly asked – good sir, whose hands are you playing into, hmm?

I’m all for pluralism and democracy, but some trash must be tossed out. Maidan didn’t happen so that our destinies could be decided by Putin’s puppets in our own parliament.

The good news:

1. The Kremlin suddenly became white and fuzzy, and more agreeable than ever. Russian Prime Minister [Dmitry] Medvedyev suddenly declared that “Russia is ready for direct negotiations with Ukraine.” The reason being – Kyiv can cut off water, power and gas supply to Crimea.

They’re right bastards in the Kremlin, make no mistake. While Russian gangs are capturing Ukrainian land, while Russian militaries kidnap Ukrainian servicemen and act like pirates to take over the ships of our Navy – Moscow doesn’t care for negotiations. “Go take a long walk off a short pier, we’re not interested in anything you’ve got to say.”

But here, the situation changed rapidly. It’s crystal clear to Medvedyev and Putin that without water and power, it will take Crimea a week to start pleading and begging to be taken back into Ukraine, and to curse the “Kremlin dwarves.”

We could cackle with glee about this. But we have to remember that the majority of Crimeans are simply hostages of Putin’s heist. It’s not their fault that they became a bargaining chip in Moscow’s insane games. This is something that the Ukrainian government must remember in any decisions regarding Crimea.

2. Today, [Acting President Olexander] Turchynov made some staffing changes in the Security Service of Ukraine [SBU]. We made some inquiries about these changes. We were assured that the main achievements of the people currently being promoted are the SBU’s strong strikes against separatists, made over the last few weeks and ongoing.. The fact that local law enforcement bodies in eastern regions are in a state of considerable stupor makes those achievements especially valuable.

There’s no argument here – Ukraine is in dire need of such work right now.

3. Russian Minister of Internal Affairs Vladimir Kolokoltsev suddenly started voiding his admiration for the bloody deeds of Ukrainian sadists from Berkut [former riot police], during Maidan events.

It seems that Russian generals have much thicker skulls than any other generals in the world. What kind of idiot do you have to be, to praise blood-splattered “heroics” of uniformed bandits against their own people? He isn’t praising sane and reasonable policemen, some of which were still in Berkut ranks. No, he’s delighted by the “heroism” of the scum. He might as well be singing praises to Gestapo or the SS.

In reality, such statements are small, but very real nails driven into the coffin of Putin and his regime. The more Moscow displays its Nazi and inhuman nature, the sooner its hyped-up power will be reduced to ashes. And good riddance.

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